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📷: @dannyngan

There’s a gigantic Wonder Bread sign in the Central District that sits atop a newer-looking apartment building that clearly does not make or sell bread. Wonder why?

Back in 1916, a Wonder Bread factory sat at 1800 South Jackson St. The factory was torn down in 2007 to make way for a new apartment development. And then in 2009 the 7,500-pound neon sign returned. Check out the full backstory that the seattlepi.com shared a few years ago.

Thanks to Seattle photographer Danny Ngan for capturing this backside angle of the historic sign.

 

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WHAT'S NEW IN THE 206

The golden rule. James Turner was honored as this year’s Metro Transit Operator of the Year. Here’s what he says it takes to be a great bus driver in Seattle: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. That’s why riders call in to King County Transit to sing his praises. BTW, did you know you can do that? Here’s the number: 206-553-3000. (KUOW)

Fried mac and cheese pops, PNW lox and handmade soba noodles. That’s just a smattering of the most delicious items coming from this fall’s most anticipated restaurant openings, according to Eater. Also on the list is Hillman City’s highly-anticipated Black & Tan Hall, which is a performing arts and restaurant venue inspired by Seattle’s Black & Tan Club from the 1930s. (Eater)

Traffic tickets were down last year. That’s because there are fewer cars on the road and Seattle drivers are more careful and courteous. JK. But the number of tickets handed out in 2016 by the Seattle Police Department are the lowest they’ve been this decade. FYI Guy Gene Balk attempts to explain why. (The Seattle Times)

Simplifying our transit payments. King County Executive Dow Constantine wants all Metro bus riders to pay a flat rate for our bus fares. That means no more zones or peak vs. off-peak distinctions – just $2.75 per person no matter what, reports KUOW. In other super-important, super-relevant-to-your-life transportation news, our mayor wants you to be able to pay for the Monorail with your Orca card, reports The Stranger. Now that’s the transit improvement we’ve been waiting for.

This salmon spill is serious. The Lummi Nation has declared a state of emergency because they say that native salmon will “have to compete with the Atlantic salmon” (the ones who escaped) for food and “could be exposed to disease,” writes Lynn Thompson of The Seattle Times. Trying to get caught up on the story? Check out this explainer from Earthfix.

HERE'S WHAT'S COMING UP

OUR EVENTS
AROUND TOWN

AND NOW WE’LL LEAVE YOU WITH THIS FUN FACT

If it doesn’t rain the rest of this month (and it’s not expected to) this will be Seattle’s driest summer in more than a century, according to local weather guru Cliff Mass. Enjoy that sunshine. – The Evergrey


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